Spring 2017

Spring 2017

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

The Keeper of the Quilts - Part 2

....so happy you have come back to see the other quilts!

The first one is quite large with a coarser backing and somewhat heavier batting. It was evidently used quite a bit. There is a little rip in one of the side sashings but everything else has stayed pretty much in tack. Attached to the plastic bag it was stored in (such a big No No) was a dry cleaning slip dated 1982....(another big No No - dry cleaning chemicals and quilts should not be used in the same sentence!)

Obviously, the quilter ran short for binding fabric and made do with what was on hand. To me it just adds more charm.

This red and white Bear Paw quilt is another one probably made in the 20th century. The hand quilting is simple, the borders a tad wavy and one of the HST's in a block is a bit unruly. But I love rich red (Turkey red?) and white in any quilt. It is going to be draped over our log railing up in the loft.
Log Cabin! ...love the softly faded colors and it appears to have been used regularly also. Some of the dark browns are about gone - apparently common due to dyes being used. Early 1900's?
Binding - indigo blue print/rounded corners
And lastly - Lone Star or Star of Bethlehem - I feel this was made as a gift for some one or perhaps a couple , newly married? It was obviously planned by the maker as they would have needed enough of the turkey red print to complete the large border. The fabrics remain bright with little fading. It appears to have minimal use if any. The pencil marks are still visible where the quilter drew her design lines - quilting stitches are 10 to the inch. This quilt has taken my heart....

I will continue to research and study these family treasures - it will be difficult to find out who made them - but I have all ready bonded with them and hope that she knows they are with someone who appreciates them and will keep them safe for now until they can be passed on to the next generation.

Pat


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, January 16, 2015

The Keeper of the Quilts....Part 1

....is what I have become. My Dad is one of two beneficiaries of cousin Susan's estate in southern Virginia. We will miss her so much for many reasons, one being that she was our family historian. She was the Keeper of Memories; which relative lived where, who married who, what kind of work they did; so many stories filled with humor and warmth. Dad asked me if there was anything we would like amongst the furniture pieces and I chose a large blanket chest. Working out shipping arrangements with the attorney handling the estate, a long ago conversation with Susan about family quilts came to mind. On checking, no one was interested in any quilts and they would be packed in the chest and sent along...

This is the blanket chest...ball feet, dovetail joints

And this is what was inside....

A much used and tattered 4 patch, widely sashed with a tiny faded blue print (Cadet or Soldier blue?) this is the best part of it...any fabrics printed with black have long since broken down...

Irish Chain - overdyed green print and chrome yellow

Close up...

Identified from one of my favorite books..

Same print - first row, 3rd on right. 1860-1880
A 20th century quilt - more modern fabrics -
look closely at the way the triangles were pieced -

Would like to know more about this one - love the pieced center medallion. Looking at the fabrics could go on forever...can you see how the quilter made an "adjustment" when her blocks did not fit just right - and the little flipped flying geese...

Who was this quilter? My great grandmother?

And did she serve holiday dinners on this circa 1840's platter? Red transferware by Adams (English). My Dad says he remembers seeing this used when he was growing up. It has been in the family forever and it was wrapped in the quilts from the blanket chest. What a treasure....

Hope you enjoyed my little Show and Tell...check back in a few days for Part 2... I have a total of 8 to share with you and there are some lovely ones yet to come....


Pat